What evidence do we find in William Shakespeare's play The Tempest that Prospero's motivation for creating the storm was to secure a future for Miranda in Naples? Are there three pieces of textual...

What evidence do we find in William Shakespeare's play The Tempest that Prospero's motivation for creating the storm was to secure a future for Miranda in Naples? Are there three pieces of textual evidence to support this?

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thanatassa | College Teacher | (Level 3) Educator Emeritus

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In William Shakespeare's play The Tempest, we don't really have textual evidence that Prospero's main motivation was to secure a future for Miranda in Naples.

The basic backstory of the play is that Prospero was Duke of Milan, and as he focused on his studies, his younger brother, Antonio, helped by Alonso, King of Naples, usurped the Dukedom and sent Prospero off with his infant daughter, Miranda, in an old and leaking boat. Since his arrival on the island, Prospero has wished to regain his rightful place as Duke. He conjures up the storm to place Antonio and Alfonso within his power and to regain his rightful Dukedom.

The romance between Ferdinand and Miranda acts as a subplot, and while Prospero is initially unsure about whether Ferdinand is worthy of Miranda's hand in marriage, eventually he is convinced by Ferdinand's constancy through various trials. The marriage, however, seems rather an extra loose end being tied up in the plot (resolution of adult conflict by having the children marry) than Prospero's main goal, which is focused on his own return to Milan.

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