In Act II of Romeo and Juliet, what is an example of forshadowing of more sinister events in Act II? For example when Romeo and Juliet get married. Friar Lawrence says "These violent delights...

In Act II of Romeo and Juliet, what is an example of forshadowing of more sinister events in Act II?

For example when Romeo and Juliet get married. Friar Lawrence says "These violent delights have violent ends/And in their triumph die, like fire and powder,/Which, as they kiss, consume" Which means that bad comes from too much good. What is another example like this?

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sullymonster | College Teacher | (Level 1) Educator Emeritus

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There are many examples.  First, the Friar's opening monolgue is foreshadows bad things that can happen from good. In talking about the qualities of the plants, he mentions that some plants might smell good, but when tasted they can be poisonous.  He says, "For naught so vile that on the earth doth live But to the earth some special good doth give; Nor aught so good but, strain'd from that fair use, Revolts from true birth, stumbling on abuse: Virtue itself turns vice, being misapplied." Act II, scene iii

At the end of the scene, the Friar foreshadows the negative consequences of acting quickly.  He says: "Wisely, and slowly. They stumble that run fast."  Romeo is rushing forward to marry Juliet, but that increases the danger that their marriage will "stumble".

In Act II, scene iv, Mercutio makes a joke about Romeo's love for Rosaline having overpowered him. Mercution says: "Alas, poor Romeo, he is already dead! stabbed with a white wench's black eye."  This joke hints that Romeo will die.  After that, we learn Tybalt has challenged Romeo to a duel. Danger is pending.

These scenes leave the reader feeling unsettled.  Although we should be happy about the marriage, small words and small events (like Tybalt's challenge) keep interfering and making us doubt that happiness can last.

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