Evaluate the extent to which the environment of the New England and Chesapeake regions affected the development of the British colonies in those regions from 1607 to 1750.

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The environment of the New England colonies held drastic importance for their development as settlements and eventually as states. There are three main things we can look at with this.

The first is arable farm land: there was not much available arable farm land in comparison to the Carolinas, Georgia,...

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The environment of the New England colonies held drastic importance for their development as settlements and eventually as states. There are three main things we can look at with this.

The first is arable farm land: there was not much available arable farm land in comparison to the Carolinas, Georgia, Virginia, Maryland, or Pennsylvania. This led them to invest less in agriculture and similar pursuits and instead spend more time on industrial skills, education, and fishing.

The second is aquatic life: their proximity to the shoreline helped them create an impressive fishing culture that they focused their settlements around. Because of this, they had smaller, more dense settlements near the ocean.

A third was the climate: the colder temperatures and severe winters led them to remain in closer shelters and develop more insulated towns (closer quarters, smaller houses, and more buildings to act as wind-blocks).

In total, this resulted in tighter, closer-knit communities that were focused less on agriculture and more on seafaring pursuits, eventually becoming merchant trading, and later would lead them to become much more industrial than their southern counterparts.

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