Evaluate of the author's claim in the essay "Me Talk Pretty One Day."

In the essay, author David Sedaris claims that learning a new skill is a tumultuous yet powerful and rewarding experience. There is a great deal of evidence that supports this claim, such as the conversations between students in which they empathize which each other’s emotions in broken French. His claim is also reinforced at the end in which he understands what the teacher says and writes that “the world opened up.”

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David Sedaris makes a few claims in this essay , but the predominant one is about the nature of new experiences. Through poking fun at the trials and tribulations of learning a new skill, Sedaris ultimately shows how learning something new can be embarrassing, tough, and wonderful, all at the...

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David Sedaris makes a few claims in this essay, but the predominant one is about the nature of new experiences. Through poking fun at the trials and tribulations of learning a new skill, Sedaris ultimately shows how learning something new can be embarrassing, tough, and wonderful, all at the same time.

In evaluating Sedaris’s claim we can look to what he wrote about his own experience. For example, consider how he mentions his tough relationship with his French instructor. He explains that the pressure he felt the instructor put on him motivated him to study for four hours each night. This highlights how learning a new skill, and in particular, a new language, can be a difficult and frustrating experience.

Yet Sedaris also explains that even as he spoke with incorrect grammar, there was a thrill in being able to somewhat communicate in the new language. In the end he writes that being able to understand and speak some French felt like “the world opened up.” The new perspective that his new skill provided is also seen in the communication between other students. Consider how Sedaris recounts a translated exchange in broken French:

“Sometimes me cry alone at night.”

“That be common for I, also, but be more strong, you.”

Yes, these people are communicating in French that was not grammatically correct. But the subject of what they are saying shows that learning the new language allows them to bond. It allows them to connect and empathize with each other. Sections like this support Sedaris’s claim about the power of new experiences.

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