In the essay "From Walden", how long does it take Thoreau to build his house in the woods? 

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Thoreau writes that he "made no haste" building his small house by Walden Pond. He began from scratch on an unspecified day at the end of March 1845, cutting down pine trees for the frame. He hewed the timbers at leisurely pace over several weeks, stopping for a "dinner of...

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Thoreau writes that he "made no haste" building his small house by Walden Pond. He began from scratch on an unspecified day at the end of March 1845, cutting down pine trees for the frame. He hewed the timbers at leisurely pace over several weeks, stopping for a "dinner of bread and butter" at noon. In mid-April, he bought a shanty from an Irishman named James Collins, disassembled it, carefully keeping the nails, transported it in cartloads to his building site, and let the boards bleach in the sun, He had a house-raising in early May with his friends. The house, however, was not yet complete because he had to add a roof, and weather proof the building. Finally, on July 4, 1845, he moved in. The whole process had taken him a little more than three months, and typified Thoreau's philosophy of doing things simply, frugally, by hand and in an unrushed way. 

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