In the Epilogue Diamond restates his original question and sums up his major points. What is he saying about the future of human history as a science?This is regarding Guns, Germs, and Steel by...

In the Epilogue Diamond restates his original question and sums up his major points. What is he saying about the future of human history as a science?

This is regarding Guns, Germs, and Steel by Jared Diamond.

Expert Answers
pohnpei397 eNotes educator| Certified Educator

To get a detailed answer to this question, look at the last two pages of the book.  This is where he lays out his argument with regard to looking at human history as a science.

What he is saying is that history cannot be done like chemistry and physics, but it can be done like evolutionary biology and climatology and things like that.  In both cases, researchers cannot do actual experiments.  But that does not mean we say that these two sciences are not real.  If evolutionary biology and climatology can be true sciences, history can move that way too.

What Diamond says is that historians need to make more use of "natural experiments" like the one involving the Polynesian islands.  He says that there are a lot of cases like that where you can use different things that happened in the past and compare them to one another.  This would make history be more like a science.

Read the study guide:
Guns, Germs, and Steel

Access hundreds of thousands of answers with a free trial.

Start Free Trial
Ask a Question