Is the English word "rapture" transliterated from the Latin Vulgate word,"Rapiemur"?For example, Messiah (Hebrew pronunciation),& Christ (English pronunciation) are one and the same person! Not...

Is the English word "rapture" transliterated from the Latin Vulgate word,"Rapiemur"?

For example, Messiah (Hebrew pronunciation),& Christ (English pronunciation) are one and the same person! Not two different people!

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larrygates's profile pic

larrygates | College Teacher | (Level 1) Educator Emeritus

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The words are similar, but their origins are separate. "Rapiemur" is from the Latin future passive meaning "we shall be carried away," or "we shall be snatched." Many Christians believe that they will be snatched up from earth before the last days, therefore they have called this event the "rapture." The actual word "rapture" employs a lofty emotion or a feeling of ecstasy. One might argue that Christians will be ecstatic when they are suddenly carried away from earth, but this is a stretched interpretation at best.

By the same token, "Messiah," and "Christ" are not the same meaning, although many Christians believe that Jesus was one and the same. Messiah is Hebrew for "the promised one of Israel." Christ is from the Greek meaning "the anointed one." Jews do not believe that Jesus was the promised one of Israel, in fact they are still waiting on the Messiah; therefore the terms do not necessarily refer to the same person.

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erkamkanaadonai59's profile pic

erkamkanaadonai59 | Student | eNotes Newbie

Posted on

So 1 Thess.4:17 is talking about the second coming,and "rapiemur" is just the Latin word for second coming! Thank you very,very much!

 

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