english link verbsWrite a detailed descripion of ENGLISH LINK VERBS?

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James Kelley eNotes educator| Certified Educator

I would add that any one verb (e.g. "look" or "become") often isn't always a linking verb. A verb that establishes in one sentence the link between the subject and the predicate noun (or predicate adjective) may behave differently in another sentence.

"become" is very often a linking verb, but it's not in this sentence: "Whatever became of your best friend in high school?" (this example may be flawed, though, because the verb here might actually be "become of," not "become")

Similarly, "look" is often a linking verb, but it's not in this sentence: "You look over your shoulder all the time."

Linking verbs are often seen as one of several verb types. Two other verb types are transitive and intransitive verbs. You may seen the term "linking" or the abbrevation "VL" after a particular entry for a verb in a dictionary, indicating that the verb, in that instance, is a linking verb.

James Kelley eNotes educator| Certified Educator

BECAME is a linking verb in both of the sentences that you give:

1. Johnson became the 36th president.

Here, "became" links the subject ("Johnson") to the predicate noun ("the 36th president" or, more simply, "president").

2. The problem of inflation became serious.

Here, "became" links the subject ("the problem") to the predicate adjective ("serious").

The verb "become" is pretty much always a linking verb. Other verbs have to be looked at closely to determine what type of verb they are functioning as inside each particular sentence. Consider the following two sentences, both using the verb "smell":

I smell the clothes. - The verb here is a transitive verb (one type of action verb).

The clothes smell fresh. - The verb here is a linking verb.

 

pohnpei397 eNotes educator| Certified Educator

Link verbs are verbs that are followed by an adjective phrase (or sometimes by a noun phrase) which is called a subject complement.  This type of verb connects the subject to the subject complement.

Some examples of link verbs could include:

The whole crowd looked very happy.  ("looked" links the whole crowd and the adjective phrase "very happy.)

He became a footballer.  ("Became" links "he" and the noun phrase "a footballer.")

ask996 eNotes educator| Certified Educator

A transitive verb takes a direct object which receives the action, and it is not complete without the direct object. An intransitive verb does not have a direct object. The linking verb with the exception of "be" verbs might also function as a transitive or intransitive verb.

npttm1 | Student

Link verbs are verbs that are followed by an adjective phrase (or sometimes by a noun phrase) which is called a subject complement.  This type of verb connects the subject to the subject complement.

Some examples of link verbs could include:

The whole crowd looked very happy.  ("looked" links the whole crowd and the adjective phrase "very happy.)

He became a footballer.  ("Became" links "he" and the noun phrase "a footballer.")

is BECAME linking or action in these sentences?

 

1. Johnson became the 36th president.

 

2. The problem of inflation became serious.