The Raven Questions and Answers
by Edgar Allan Poe

The Raven book cover
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At the end of the poem "The Raven," what does the speaker want from the raven?  

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mamireloaded eNotes educator | Certified Educator

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He wants the bird to go away and leave no trace behind. His wish is not granted though.

The raven is clearly no ordinary bird. Not only does he speak (although only a single word), but he also represents something else to the narrator, something dark. It's possible that the raven represents the inevitable passage of time, suggesting that has gone will never return, including the beloved Lenore. The raven becomes a burden, representing the impossibility of letting go of sadness and melancholy to go on and live a peaceful life.

At the end of the poem, the narrator becomes downhearted; he receives no hope from the raven and he falls into despair. So he begs the raven to go away, to leave no sign of his ominous presence: "Leave no black plume as a token of that lie thy soul hath spoken!" He wants to be left alone with his memories.

But the raven never leaves. At the end of the poem, the narrator realizes this is it for him, he is dead in spirit: "And my soul from out that shadow that lies floating on the floor / Shall be lifted—nevermore!"

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pohnpei397 eNotes educator | Certified Educator

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By the time this poem ends, the speaker has gotten really tired of having the raven around.  Throughout much of the poem, the raven's answers to the speaker's questions have been getting the speaker more and more hysterical.  The speaker has come to see the raven as some messenger from the devil who has come to haunt him and make his life miserable.

Because of this, the speaker wants the raven to just get out.  This is seen in the next to the last stanza of the poem.  There, the speaker says

`Get thee back into the tempest and the Night's Plutonian shore!
Leave no black plume as a token of that lie thy soul hath spoken!
Leave my loneliness unbroken! - quit the bust above my door!
Take thy beak from out my heart, and take thy form from off my door!'

So he is telling the raven to just get out.  Of course, all the raven says is "nevermore" and it does not leave so the speaker does not get what he wants.

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