Emily Dickinson compared to Robert FrostI would like to compare Dickinson's "Because I could not stop for Death" with Frost's "Stopping by Woods on a snowy night."  I need to compare ONE aspect of...

Emily Dickinson compared to Robert Frost

I would like to compare Dickinson's "Because I could not stop for Death" with Frost's "Stopping by Woods on a snowy night."  I need to compare ONE aspect of their styles or themes.  Not looking for anyone to write a paper for me, I just need a starting point please.  Thank you.

Asked on by harley08

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booboosmoosh's profile pic

booboosmoosh | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Educator Emeritus

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Comparing "Stopping By Woods on a Snowy Evening"  by Robert Frost, and "Because I could not stop for Death" by Emily Dickinson, have some similarities and differences in terms of style.

Both poems are written in four-line stanzas. The meter of both poems is rhythmic and lilting. Each poem seem to follow a contrived pattern of beats (but the patterns are different).

The last way in which the poems are the same is that each author uses personification.

Frost personifies the horse—

My little horse must think it queer
To stop without a farmhouse near

and Dickinson personifies Death—

Because I could not stop for Death,
He kindly stopped for me;

However, the poems are dissimilar in several ways.

Frost's poem has a clear rhyme scheme of AABA.

Dickinson's poem does not have clear rhyme at all. Some lines might have end rhyme following an ABCB pattern, but there is only one instance of true rhyme ("ground" / "mound"), and perhaps near rhyme for most of the remaining stanzas (though it is a far stretch, I think, with "ring" and "sun").

The meter in Frost's poem is distinct, with four stressed beats per line. Dickinson's poem is different than Frost's. The pattern she creates for the most part is comprised of alternating lines of four beats, then three beats, returning to four beats again.

 

Source:

<http://www.poemofquotes.com/articles/poetry_technique.php>

 

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