elements of thoughtLook at the “elements of thought” and compare them to the “right questions”. What are the similarities and differences? Is one approach ‘better’ than the other or...

elements of thought

Look at the “elements of thought” and compare them to the “right questions”. What are the similarities and differences? Is one approach ‘better’ than the other or should their positive points be blended one with the other (and if so, which ones)?

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megan-bright's profile pic

megan-bright | (Level 1) Associate Educator

Posted on

I think the elements of thought and the "right questions" go hand in hand with each other. They are both examining the same concepts, but from different perspectives. Both approaches suggest a person examine an issue using well-rounded, broad, detailed, thoughtful, educational, and reflective techniques.

litteacher8's profile pic

litteacher8 | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

Posted on

Asking the right questions means determining what information you need to make logical arguments. The elements of thoughts are the information and processes needed to make specific decisions. Both involve critical thinking, but the elements of thought see more descriptive and the asking the right questions more prescriptive.
readerofbooks's profile pic

readerofbooks | College Teacher | (Level 2) Educator Emeritus

Posted on

It seems that the point being made is that there are two important things to do in critical thinking - asking the right question and knowing that essential principle or point in view. Both are important and I do not know if we have to make a decision of what is more important. It is only when we know the point in view that we will have the "right questions." Also it is by asking the "right questions," that we will come to understand something. In short, both are interrelated.

accessteacher's profile pic

accessteacher | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

Posted on

I agree that we need more information, but at the same time I do think the concept of identifying and then asking the 'right questions' is particularly important in terms of critical thinking. Too often we ask the wrong questions which greatly inhibits our capacity to analyse something critically.

vangoghfan's profile pic

vangoghfan | College Teacher | (Level 2) Educator Emeritus

Posted on

I'm not sure I understand the original post as clearly as I would like to understand it.  Is there any way that you can give us a fuller explanation of what you mean? I agree that asking the "right questions" (that is, the questions that are most pertinent and relevant) is ideal. Often, of course, it takes a long time of trial and error to figure out what the "right questions" are.

literaturenerd's profile pic

literaturenerd | High School Teacher | (Level 2) Educator Emeritus

Posted on

One does, indeed, have to ask the right questions in order to get the answers which probe the issue. Proper analysis can only be made if the questions asked are the ones which force those to scrutinize the issues critically. That being said, not all people analyze things in the same way. One must be sure to have multiple questions regarding the same issue in order to speak to the cognitive processes of all involved.

pohnpei397's profile pic

pohnpei397 | College Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

Posted on

I like the idea that asking the right questions is the whole basis of critical thinking.  It seems to me that the whole point of critical thinking is finding out what questions need to be asked so that an issue can be properly analyzed.  There is no real way to think correctly about something unless you are asking the right questions about it.

woodroff's profile pic

Woody Durant | Student, Undergraduate | (Level 2) Salutatorian

Posted on

"The book, Asking the Right Questions, suggests that the right questions are:

  1. “What are the issues and the conclusions?
  2. What are the reasons?
  3. Which words or phrases are ambiguous?
  4. What are the value conflicts and assumptions?
  5. What are the descriptive assumptions?
  6. Are there any fallacies in the reasoning?
  7. How good is the evidence?
  8. Are there rival causes?
  9. Are the statistics deceptive?
  10. What significant information is omitted?
  11. What reasonable conclusions are possible?” (Browne and Keeley, 2007, p.13)"

Look at the “elements of thought” and compare them to the “right questions”. What are the similarities and differences? Is one approach ‘better’ than the other or should their positive points be blended one with the other (and if so, which ones)?

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