In "Blues Ain't No Mockin Bird," what is the effect(s) from the main cause of conflict? Is it true that one can only imagine the ending of the story with a negative effect because of the two...

In "Blues Ain't No Mockin Bird," what is the effect(s) from the main cause of conflict? Is it true that one can only imagine the ending of the story with a negative effect because of the two filmmakers not respecting the request of the land owner?

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Karen P.L. Hardison eNotes educator| Certified Educator

Short of an early epiphany on the part of the filmmakers, the effect(s) of the main cause of conflict in "Blues Ain't No Mockin Bird" would almost inevitably be dramatic. The main cause of conflict in the story is the filmmakers' persistence in treating Granny and the four children playing outside as objects lacking human value or dignity. Illustrating examples of this are that while enumerating Granny's "nice things," Smilin includes the children in the list right along with the toolshed, trees and stones and continually insistes on giving Granny the depersonalizing label "aunty," stereotyping her in a role lacking dignity.

This cause, treatment devoid of recognition of human dignity, was underlying the filmmakers refusal to accept Granny's denial of permission to film her and her family on her private property. Granny didn't have the power to overwhelm the filmmakers, but Granddaddy, once he arrived, was able to open the filmmakers' eyes to his individual dignity and value and able to make them hear his voice and receive his communication.

One of the effects of the main cause of conflict is Granny's anger, which the children and Granddaddy recognized might have explodes into demonstrable violence had Granddaddy not arrived home when he did. Another effect is the peaceful, pointed and highly demonstrative breaking of the cameraman's camera.

These effects then had an effect of their own in that the filmmakers recognized that they had no choice but to leave the premises. Had the filmmakers had an epiphany earlier, they would have recognized the individual dignity and humanity of Granny and the children and respected Granny's wishes and excused themselves.

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Blues Ain't No Mockingbird

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