Educational changes made during 1930s that relate to/happen in To Kill a Mockingbird?I'm trying to write a research paper on the above and I'm having some trouble finding some things that could...

Educational changes made during 1930s that relate to/happen in To Kill a Mockingbird?

I'm trying to write a research paper on the above and I'm having some trouble finding some things that could relate to the book.

Expert Answers
santari eNotes educator| Certified Educator

To Kill a Mockingbird is set in the 1930's, a time in which schools were still segregated between whites and blacks, and would remain so for decades afterwards.  In the south, the situation was even worse because few high schools even existed for blacks.  Calpurnia tells the children she is one of only four people in her entire church who can read.

Ironically, what began to change in 1930s education came about largely  because of the tough economic times.  As a way to save money, school boards in the north began to abolish segregated education -- it was cheaper to fund one school than two schools.  Franklin Roosevelt's New Deal created agencies like the National Youth Administration, which by 1940 had taught more than five hundred thousand illiterate blacks to read and write, and the number of blacks attending high school doubled.

One other point worth mentioning is that education at that time was much more structured and formalized than it is today. For example, Scout's first grade teacher is concerned with all the kids following a rigid system rather than encouraging their individual learning skills. In 1934 the Progressive Education Association began a study aimed at modernizing schools to look more broadly at academic achievement and reflect a more contemporary, multicultural, and scientific curriculum.

beckyloo17 | Student

In addition to the respose above I have a variation of that question. What difference of education occured between white and black people? Did that also effect women in the book?

sarahtxc | Student

Thanks! That helped a lot.

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To Kill a Mockingbird

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