"Early Victorian literature is the continuation of Romanticism." Elaborate and give arguments.Answer according to the statement.

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amarang9 | College Teacher | (Level 2) Educator Emeritus

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This is the case with early Victorian literature only because it came right after Romanticism. But Victorian literature soon went off in different directions as all new artistic movements do. For example, Edward Lear began to use different, freer styles of verse.

The most dramatic change from the Romantic period to the Victorian age was the increasing prevalence of the novel. This was more than just a stylistic shift. The 19th century English novel focused more on social and economic life, whereas at least the poetry of the Romantics was more focused on individualism and imagination. Charles Dickens might be the quintessential Victorian novelist by the definition of writing about social and economic issues and the middle class. George Eliot (Mary Anne Evans) is often credited with establishing the psychological novel. Notable women writers emerged from this period (Jane Austen and Virginia Woolf to name just two). Around the time of the American Civil War (1861-65), a civil rights movement was occurring on both sides of the Atlantic when people were calling for the abolition of slavery and championing equal rights for women. This coincided with a lot more women writers getting published. But, as you can see with the pseudonym George Eliot, some women still had to assume male identities in order to get published.

Going back to the Romantics, if Dorothy Wordsworth and her brother William had lived in the Victorian age, we may have seen as many publications from her as from her brother.

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shewa55 | (Level 1) Valedictorian

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It is very interesting question, I think someone will answer this question.If the answer is less than 500 words it is injustice because the question  deserve it.

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