The Veldt Questions and Answers
by Ray Bradbury

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Early in The Veldt, what evidence are we given that the Happylife Home system has not made either of the adults particularly happy? What message might Bradbury be trying to deliver here?

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The mother is nervous about the nursery from the start of the story. In fact, she expresses her anxiety in the very first line: "George, I'd wish you'd look at the nursery," and then, to justify herself, says "It's just that the nursery is different now than it was." Lydia senses that something has changed about the nursery, and her fear of the lions is based on intuition, rather than reason. When George laughs at her for being afraid, Bradbury is framing the issue the story raises, which is that technology is not value neutral. George's belief that the nursery is just "crystal walls" suggests that he thinks the nursery is simply a plaything, or a means of entertainment...

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