Early in "The Veldt," what evidence are we given that the Happylife Home system has not made either of the adults particularly happy? What message might Bradbury be trying to deliver here?

Lydia senses that the nursery has changed somehow. George laughs at her fears.

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The mother is nervous about the nursery from the start of the story. In fact, she expresses her anxiety in the very first line: "George, I'd wish you'd look at the nursery," and then, to justify herself, says "It's just that the nursery is different now than it was." Lydia...

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The mother is nervous about the nursery from the start of the story. In fact, she expresses her anxiety in the very first line: "George, I'd wish you'd look at the nursery," and then, to justify herself, says "It's just that the nursery is different now than it was." Lydia senses that something has changed about the nursery, and her fear of the lions is based on intuition, rather than reason. When George laughs at her for being afraid, Bradbury is framing the issue the story raises, which is that technology is not value neutral. George's belief that the nursery is just "crystal walls" suggests that he thinks the nursery is simply a plaything, or a means of entertainment for their children. Lydia, however, knows better: she sees the nursery as an indication of some inward shift in her children (which is why she wants a psychologist to "look" at it). Her anxiety comes from knowing that somehow the nursery is enabling her children to realize their darkest fantasies, and that through it, she has effectively lost her ability to be a parent.

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Both parents show fear of the lions on the viewscreens in the nursery early on in the story. Soon afterwards, Lydia says to George:

I feel like I don't belong here. ... Can I compete with an African veldt? Can I give a bath and scrub the children as efficiently or quickly as the automatic scrub bath can? I cannot. And it isn't just me. It's you. You've been awfully nervous lately.

While they bought the Happylife home so that it would do all the work for them, the parents realize after the fact that the home has taken over parenting their children. Their children are turning on the parents, favoring the nursery. George and Lydia's dream house has become a nightmare that is tearing the family apart and ruining their children. Both parents have become increasingly uneasy and uncertain what to do. 

Bradbury's message is that technology in modern society is out of control, displacing and destroying traditional human relationships. Too much technology becomes a trap that robs people of meaning and humanity. 

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