Is the Early Expansion the same as the Western Expansion?

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Although Early Expansion can refer to a host of different times and spaces, such as the early expansion of Christianity or Islam, of the Human Species, of the Ottoman Empire, of the Universe, etc. -- given the likelihood of the referent being America, then we are speaking of the same...

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Although Early Expansion can refer to a host of different times and spaces, such as the early expansion of Christianity or Islam, of the Human Species, of the Ottoman Empire, of the Universe, etc. -- given the likelihood of the referent being America, then we are speaking of the same thing when say the Early Expansion of America and the Western Expansion of America. Furthermore, this specific phenomenon is most widely labeled as the Westward Expansion of America. 

This period is conventionally considered to commence in 1803, when Thomas Jefferson purchased the territory of Louisiana from the French. However, in contrast to the size of the state of Louisiana today, the territory purchased included around 14 states, and nearly doubled the total existing area of the United States. By 1912, Arizona, the last of the 48 contiguous United States, joined the union, and marked the close of the official period known as Westward expansion. Between 1803-1912,  the realization of America's manifest destiny also included the Lewis & Clark Expedition (1803-1806), War of 1812, Monroe Doctrine (1823), Battle of the Alamo (1826), Indian Removal Act (1830), Mexican American War (1846), Gold Rush (1848), Kansas-Nebraska Act (1854), The Oregon Territory (1859), Transcontinental Railroad (1863-1869), Homestead Act (1862), and The Sand Creek Massacre (1864), amongst other events. 

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