In Dylan Thomas's poem "Do Not Go Gentle into That Good Night," what effect does the repetition of "Do not go gentle into that good night" and "Rage, rage against the dying of the light" have?

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In this villanelle by Dylan Thomas, the final line of each three-line stanza alternates between "Rage, rage against the dying of the light" and "Do not go gentle into that good night." The first line is "Do not go gentle into that good night," and the final line is "Rage, rage against the dying of the light." This results in each line being repeated four times. However, each time each line is used, it works into the flow of the argument of the words of the stanza. The lines are not merely appended as a disjointed refrain. 

Each stanza gives an example of the kind of person who does not go gentle into that good night and/or rages against the dying of the light. Wise men, good men, wild men, and grave men all stand as examples, according to the poet, to his father, whom the poet wishes would fight against his approaching death. Although to see his father resisting death might in one sense be a "curse" because it would be hard to observe, nevertheless the poet feels it would be a...

(The entire section contains 2 answers and 532 words.)

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