Drown Why the author of Drown(Junot Diaz) choose  those specific moments in his chilhood to describe?why are they important to him?

Expert Answers

An illustration of the letter 'A' in a speech bubbles
Drown

Why the author of Drown(Junot Diaz) choose  those specific moments in his chilhood to describe?why are they important to him?

The absence of the main character's father was such a defining factor in the way he viewed relationships and the way he prioritized his adult life.  The moments in his childhood that were described were pieces of his father that he remembered, but also explained why he operated in the manner he did.  His on-and-off relationship with Aurora, and later, Loretta, illustrated his "user" mentality toward women his lack of empathy toward people was actually a learned behavior modeled by his father. 

The chapter "Fiesta, 1980", where Junior was forced to forgo the wonderful array of food at the party, rather than throw-up in the new VW, was so important because at that young age he was learning that possessions were more important than people, thus contributing to Yunior's life of stealing and vandalism. 

Finally, these specific moments Diaz chose to describe shows the breakdown of his relationship with his mother. He worships his mother as a young child, would die protecting her, and even dreams along with her as she never loses hope. However, after Diaz throws the explanation of the father into the last chapter, giving the reader a little insight into the mystery of the father's other life, we begin to understand his frustration.  Nevertheless, his father's drifting has taught him that men are that way, and he is doomed as this man's son.

Approved by eNotes Editorial Team
Soaring plane image

We’ll help your grades soar

Start your 48-hour free trial and unlock all the summaries, Q&A, and analyses you need to get better grades now.

  • 30,000+ book summaries
  • 20% study tools discount
  • Ad-free content
  • PDF downloads
  • 300,000+ answers
  • 5-star customer support
Start your 48-Hour Free Trial