Dreams and nightmares play a recurrent role throughout Shelley’s Frankenstein. How do they relate to changes in Victor’s character?

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On the boat on chapter 21, Victor dreams that

I felt the fiend’s grasp on my neck and could not free myself from it; groans and cries rang in my ears.

But more important is Victor's reaction:

My father, who was watching over me, perceiving my restlessness, awoke me; the dashing waves were around, the cloudy sky above, the fiend was not here: a sense of security, a feeling that a truce was established between the present hour and the irresistible, disastrous future imparted to me a kind of calm forgetfulness, of which the human mind is by its structure peculiarly susceptible.

Victor feels "calm" after this dream: this is an important change in him as he has been frenzied for a long time. This calm signals acceptance of what is to come, a sense of accepting the inevitability of disaster.

In chapter 23, after the monster kills Elizabeth and, as a result, Frankenstein's father—unable to bear the horror any longer—dies in his son's arms, Frankenstein has a recurrent dream:

Sometimes, indeed, I...

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