Dracula The Undead, by Dacre Stoker and Ian HoltHas anyone else read this sequel to Bram Stoker's Dracula? I just finished it, and found it somewhat unsatisfying, due primarily to the changes made...

Dracula The Undead, by Dacre Stoker and Ian Holt

Has anyone else read this sequel to Bram Stoker's Dracula? I just finished it, and found it somewhat unsatisfying, due primarily to the changes made in Dracula's character. I felt that the authors "de-fanged" Dracula.

 

 

 

Expert Answers
angelcann eNotes educator| Certified Educator

Is this a new book? I haven't heard of it, but it wouldn't surprise me that Dracula is "de-fanged", as you say, if it was written in the last couple of years. There has been SUCH a huge vampire glut, and the trend with Twilight and the Sookie Stackhouse books has been to make being a vampire a desirable option.

It is pretty new -- published in November 2009, if I remember correctly.

It surprised me that the authors took this approach to Dracula, essentially trying to make him the hero of the novel, since Stoker clearly intended him to be a villain. Stoker himself isn't depicted in too favorable a light, which was also surprising, since one of the authors, his great-grand-nephew, claimed he wrote the book in part to give the story back to the family, who haven't received any US royalties, since the original novel's US copyright wasn't valid.

 

 

amy-lepore eNotes educator| Certified Educator

I agree that sequels written by authors other than the original person are almost always disappointing.  This is especially true if the two authors didn't know one another personally and decades of time separate the original work and the sequel.

I haven't read this sequel, but the discussion on this website has definitely peaked my interest...I'll have to go visit the bookstore and add another book to my bedside table.

Dracula as a warrior of God?  Humm...that does seem a bit over the top.

angelcann eNotes educator| Certified Educator

Not that it's particularly literary, but I did like Eoin Colfer's And Another Thing -- his addition to Douglas Adams' Hitchhiker's Guide series. I didn't expect the book to be as good as the originals, and I was pleasantly surprised.

I had read good reviews of Dracula the Undead, which was why I decided to give it a chance.

ask996 eNotes educator| Certified Educator

There seem to be two major problems with sequels not written by the original author. One: the sequel’s author usually has a different intent or agenda i.e. Stoker’s nephew wanting to bring the royalties back to the family. Two: the devoted readers expect a similar style and/or author intent with the sequel, and that is hard to fulfill.

lynn30k eNotes educator| Certified Educator

Is this a new book? I haven't heard of it, but it wouldn't surprise me that Dracula is "de-fanged", as you say, if it was written in the last couple of years. There has been SUCH a huge vampire glut, and the trend with Twilight and the Sookie Stackhouse books has been to make being a vampire a desirable option.

accessteacher eNotes educator| Certified Educator

Do you not think that the majority of sequels written by someone else turn out to be disappointing? So many spring to mind, without very many exceptions to the rule. I guess trying to follow in the shadow of such a great work is almost certainly doomed to failure. Can you think of any exceptions?

litteacher8 eNotes educator| Certified Educator

Actually, vampires really have been romanticized lately.  It makes sense that someone would try to reimagine Dracula.  It is not so much a sequel as a rewriting, kind of like the story of "The Three Little Pigs" from the wolf's perspective.

angelcann eNotes educator| Certified Educator

I was prepared for a different style, but, and I'll admit this was naive of me, I had expected more of an homage than an agenda. The last thing I expected was for Dracula to be depicted as a warrior of God. That was just too much.