Don't worry, I've read the book, but I'm a little bit confused about the prompt.Please explain the prompt and what kind of things I should talk about.Although literary critics have tended to praise...

Don't worry, I've read the book, but I'm a little bit confused about the prompt.Please explain the prompt and what kind of things I should talk about.

Although literary critics have tended to praise the unqieu in literary characterization, many authors have employed the sterotyped character successfully. Select a chracter or characters from Lord of the Flies and in a well-written essay show how the conventional or stereotyped character or characters function to achieve the author's purpose.

Thank you!

Expert Answers
ajmchugh eNotes educator| Certified Educator

Good question!  I think you could make a case that many of the characters in Lord of the Flies are stereotyped.  Take, for example, Piggy.  From the moment readers meet him, he appears to be a stereotypical "brainy" character; he is intelligent, wears glasses, seems to be babied (numerous references to his "Auntie and his asthma are examples), and is picked on by the other children on the island. 

Despite Piggy's intelligence and understanding of many of the situations on the island, he is virtually powerless without the protection of Ralph--and this is a direct result of the other characters' perceptions of him.  They fail to take him seriously because he's the butt of their jokes, and his death is representative of the children's decline into savagery.  In essence, Golding uses Piggy to show that in stressful situations like the one on the island, savagery will ultimately prevail over reason. 

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Lord of the Flies

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