does vinegar, sugar, oil have an effect on the time it takes for water to boil?i'm doing a scientific experiment and i'm testing how long it takes for water with different liquids dissolved in it...

does vinegar, sugar, oil have an effect on the time it takes for water to boil?

i'm doing a scientific experiment and i'm testing how long it takes for water with different liquids dissolved in it to boil.

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ndnordic's profile pic

ndnordic | High School Teacher | (Level 2) Associate Educator

Posted on

In general, any time you dissolve a substance in water it increases the boiling point of the mixture.  An example of this is in a car's radiator. Water alone will boil at 100 degrees C but if you add anti-freeze to it you can increase the boiling point several degrees higher.

In your experiment, adding vinegar and sugar to the water should increase the boiling point so it would take longer than  if you were just heating water by itself. The water without anything else is your control in this experiment.  You also need to be sure you use the same volume each time and heat it exactly the same to test your hypothesis.

However, oil will probably not affect the boiling point because the oil will not dissolve in the water. If the density is less than water it will float on top and if the density is greater it will form a layer on the bottom.

 

chaobas's profile pic

chaobas | College Teacher | (Level 1) Valedictorian

Posted on

boiling point depend on the molrlity of the solution.

that is if a solute is added to water than it will effect both boiling and freezing point of the water. 

when sugar, vinegar is added it will increases the molality of the water which inturn increases the boiling point of the water and decreases the freeezing point. this is term as elvation in boiling point and depression in freezing point.

the elvation in boiling point can be found by using the formula

delta T = m * Tb * i

delta T = change in boiling point

m = molality 

Tb = elluscospic constant (it is 0.512 C/m for water)

i = vant hoff vactor.

 

Sources:

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