Does the play A Raisin in the Sun have a "happy ending"? Why or why not? What do the Youngers have in store for them once they move?

Ultimately, it is uncertain whether the play A Raisin in the Sun has a "happy ending," as the Younger family’s fate is uncertain. They will likely face discrimination and hardship in Clybourne Park, but they are also closer to achieving their dreams by moving. The very last scene underlines the importance of not giving up in the face of uncertainty. Although debatable, this glimmer of hope at the end can be interpreted as a happy ending.

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Since A Raisin in the Sun ends without showing the audience the results of the Younger family’s move, it is difficult to say whether it is a happy ending or not. However, the ending underscores the family’s determination, and thus, it sends a message about the importance of perseverance.

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Since A Raisin in the Sun ends without showing the audience the results of the Younger family’s move, it is difficult to say whether it is a happy ending or not. However, the ending underscores the family’s determination, and thus, it sends a message about the importance of perseverance.

The Younger family knows that they will face discrimination from their neighbors in Clybourne Park. They know this because Karl Lindner came and told the family that the community of White residents do not want them to move in. However, the family decides to go anyway, as moving into this house is an important step forward for them.

While they will likely face discrimination in their new community, it is unclear what else the family has in store for them. For example, whether or not Beneatha will ever be able to study medicine is not clear. Yet the last moment of the play sends an important message about perseverance and creates a glimmer of hope. Consider how Mama “comes back in, grabs her plant, and goes out for the last time.” Mama’s dream has always been to have a flourishing garden. Now that her family is moving to a house with a lot of sunlight coming in, she will come closer to achieving this goal. The way she comes back for the plant suggests that although the future of the family is uncertain, Mama keeps believing in her dream. Thus, Hansberry ultimately suggests the importance of determination, even in the face of a tough, uncertain future.

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The ending of the play A Raisin in the Sun is not necessarily happy, but it does seem hopeful. As the play closes, the Younger family has been swindled, but they are still optimistically planning a move to a new house. Walter had decided to use their money to move them to a nicer neighborhood, but the worrisome issue is that this neighborhood is all white, and they will be the overwhelming minority in comparison.

There are many stressful things placed on the family here at the end, as their financial security is feeble and they are moving to a place where they will almost certainly face prejudice. However, the family believes the situation will be safer for their children, and they will have a better life overall. So while there are worries, and all is certainly not resolved, the play ends on a hopeful note.

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Lorraine Hansberry ends the play on a positive, hopeful note as Walter Jr. refuses to sell their recently purchased home back to the Clybourne Park community and the Youngers continue packing their belongings for the upcoming move. Walter's dramatic decision reveals his change of heart and demonstrates his integrity, pride, and resolve. Despite the fact that Walter's shady business partner stole the majority of Lena's insurance money, the Younger family still decides to move into the all-white community. Even though their financial security and well-being are compromised by deciding to move into Clybourne Park, Lena and her family's dreams are still very much alive and attainable. Given the current racial atmosphere and sentiment surrounding black families moving into white areas throughout Chicago, the audience can't help but worry about the Younger family's safety. Despite the obvious risks and racial discrimination they are bound to experience, there is hope and faith that the Younger family will persevere in their new community. 

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The happy ending depends on one's persepctive.  Lorraine Hansberry felt the audience as a whole really misunderstood the ending of her play.  The Youngers are getting out of the ghetto and moving into a better neighborhood.  However, they could be and probably will be firebombed, harassed, and threatened in Clybourne Park.  Hansberry was almost killd as a child because someone threw a brick through the window of her family's home in a White neighborhood.  Her mother then stood guard with a shotgun.  The ending of the play is ambiguous.  They are going to own their own home and Walter has grown up a lot, BUT they are going where they aren't wanted and none of them is ignorant of this fact.  A lot of progressive White people upon seeing this play--thought 'Yay for them.'  A lot of realistic Black people recognized the incredible struggle the Youngers were in for.  So, the ending is much like life--uncertain bring the good with the bad.

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I would say that the ending is a relatively happy one. Walter has stood up for his family, showing more commitment and veracity than he had previously shown at any other time in the work.  At the same time, the family getting out of its condition and moving to the suburbs is a move that is done out of the family's best interests.  While there are so many social and personal circumstances that are besieging the Younger family, it becomes redemptive to see them embrace the move together and not show fear about.  The taking care of the plant, something that was a challenge throughout the play, will now be facilitated much easier with this in mind.  Additionally, I think that the expecting addition to the family also provides hope. Certainly, they will face challenges in Clybourne Park and there is little to believe that these elements will not be present.  Yet, the family is aware of that and still is willing to take the risk for it is worth the reward.  This becomes the essence of what immigration and movement in America is about, a reason for optimism at the end of the play.

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