Does The Crucible promote lying?

Far from promoting lying, The Crucible reveals the detrimental impact that lies can have. Through lying, Abigail is responsible for the vicious accusations and Salem witch trials, and she is the villain of the play. Because of her lies, people's lives are upended. Many die, including John Proctor. His lies are revealed, and he is punished for them but achieves redemption when he confesses his sins and atones. Abigail never atones. Although she lives, she is vilified.

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The Crucible does not promote lying. In fact, Abigail, who is largely responsible for the vicious accusations and subsequent trials that take place in Salem during the fictionalized account of the witch trials, is the villain of the play.

As a result of her lies, people's lives are upended—many perish....

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The Crucible does not promote lying. In fact, Abigail, who is largely responsible for the vicious accusations and subsequent trials that take place in Salem during the fictionalized account of the witch trials, is the villain of the play.

As a result of her lies, people's lives are upended—many perish. This includes John Proctor, a complicated hero because of his flaws, which the play presents clearly. He betrays his wife by having an extramarital affair with Abigail and then telling her that their relationship is over. Abigail's continued longing for John and her belief that she and John could resume their relationship if Elizabeth Proctor were out of the way is an underlying cause of her growing hatred of Elizabeth and motivation for her accusations of witchcraft.

Although Abigail does succeed in lying to the local townspeople and the Salem officials, she is not a likable character. John Proctor's lies are revealed, and he is punished for them. He, however, achieves redemption at the end of the play by confessing his lies and sins and atoning. Abigail never atones for her lies, and they are not shown in a positive light at all. Her character is meant to be seen as the villain.

The Crucible seeks to reveal that underlying motives for pointing the finger at innocent people need to be investigated and revealed in the play itself as much as in the actual witch trials that took place in Salem during the late seventeenth century. In fact, playwright Arthur Miller is quoted as saying that after he read the 1867 book Salem Witchcraft by Charles W. Upham (which evaluates the personal relationships of many participants in the Salem witch trials), he felt motivated to bring light to the interpersonal relationships that led to so much tragedy.

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