In Countee Cullen's poem "Yet Do I Marvel," does the speaker's attitude towards God change or do we sense that his attitude shifts or changes over the course of the poem? If so, how does his...

In Countee Cullen's poem "Yet Do I Marvel," does the speaker's attitude towards God change or do we sense that his attitude shifts or changes over the course of the poem? If so, how does his attitude change and where does he end up?

Yet Do I marvel? By COUNTEE Cullen

Asked on by mbitang2000

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noahvox2 | College Teacher | (Level 2) Educator

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Countee Cullen published his wonderful little sonnet "Yet Do I Marvel" in 1925. He opens his poem by acknowledging that God is "good, well-meaning, kind" and then proceeds to declare that if God were so inclined, God would/could explain the reasons why various things happen in the world. Cullen goes on to indicate that God's ways are "Inscrutable" and that human minds cannot begin to comprehend God's mind. Cullen ends the poem by wondering why God made "a poet black, and bid him sing."

As I read this poem, I do not find a shift in the author's attitude. He begins by acknowledging that God has to power to explain the world's mysteries if he chose to do so, but that human beings are really incapable of understanding God's reasoning. Still, the poet can't help but wonder why God has called him to be a poet.

So, I'm hard pressed to see how the speaker's attitude towards God changes in the course of this brief poem.

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