What do we learn about Burris and Ewell family in Chapter 3 of To Kill a Mockingbird?I had to read the novel for school and had to answer this question afterward. I don't know what to answer, can...

What do we learn about Burris and Ewell family in Chapter 3 of To Kill a Mockingbird?

I had to read the novel for school and had to answer this question afterward. I don't know what to answer, can someone help me? Thank you.

1 Answer | Add Yours

bullgatortail's profile pic

bullgatortail | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Distinguished Educator

Posted on

We learn that young Burris Ewell is "the filthiest human I had ever seen," and that his hair is filled with "cooties"--head lice. Like many of the poor children, Burris is repeating the first grade: He comes the "first day every year and then leave(s)" so the truant officer won't bother the family. We find that Burris "ain't got no mother" (she's dead), and that Bob Ewell is "right contentious." Burris is apparently big for his age, since Little Chuck Little is only "half his height." Burris is crude and foul-mouthed, cursing the teacher and calling her a "snot-nosed slut" as he leaves the classroom. Atticus later tells Scout that "the Ewells had been the disragce of Maycomb for three generations," that none of the family worked, and that they "lived like animals." The Ewells were unlike any other family in Maycomb, Atticus told Scout, that they were "members of an exclusive society made up of Ewells." Bob breaks the law routinely: He "hunt(s) and trap(s) out of season," and he drinks up the family's relief check on "green whiskey."

Sources:

We’ve answered 318,995 questions. We can answer yours, too.

Ask a question