Does Parris end up as a broken man in The Crucible?

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Yes . At the beginning of the play, Reverend Parris is a relatively powerful member of the community, who is worried that his position as Salem's minister will be threatened by the rumors of witchcraft surrounding his home. As the play progresses, Reverend Parris is portrayed as a greedy, selfish...

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Yes. At the beginning of the play, Reverend Parris is a relatively powerful member of the community, who is worried that his position as Salem's minister will be threatened by the rumors of witchcraft surrounding his home. As the play progresses, Reverend Parris is portrayed as a greedy, selfish man, who is only concerned about his salary and position as minister. When John Proctor challenges the corrupt court, Reverend Parris sides with Deputy Governor Danforth and Judge Hathorne in order to protect his position and status. Despite the fact that John Proctor is arrested, Reverend Parris feels the pressure of the community directed towards himself and the court. In Act Four, Reverend Parris is no longer depicted as a powerful man with confidence in the court and is instead portrayed as a timid, broken man. Reverend Parris laments to Danforth about how Abigail stole all of the money out of his safe before she fled Salem, leaving him penniless and depressed. Reverend Parris also fears for his life. He tells Danforth that he discovered a dagger stuck in his door and feels threatened by the possibility of a riot similar to the one that took place in Andover. He even pleads with Danforth to postpone the hangings in order to appease the disgruntled citizens. By the end of the play, Reverend Parris is depicted as a penniless, anxious, broken man, who has lost his confidence and peace of mind. 

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In many ways, yes.  When Reverend Parris first appears in Act Four, "He is gaunt, frightened, and sweating in his greatcoat."  He confesses that none of the convicted will speak to him anymore and that his niece, Abigail Williams, the girl whose actions essentially started the entire hysteria, has run off with all his money.  "Thirty-one pound is gone," he says, "I am penniless.  He covers his face and sobs."  He knows that the trials had more to do with revenge and land than they had to do with witchcraft, and it has affected him physically.  He is disrespected by those people whom he had always previously respected, and he must continue to doubt the validity of the proceedings now that Abigail has robbed him and run off.  Even Danforth says, "Mr. Parris, you are a brainless man!"  This line shows how mentally and emotionally broken he has become.

On top of this, Parris is credibly fearful of rebellion now that it is clear that the majority of the community does not support the trials, and -- most especially -- he fears for his own life.  He says, "Tonight, when I open my door to leave my house -- a dagger clattered to the ground [....].  You cannot hang this sort.  There is danger for me.  I dare not step outside at night!"  His guilt, fear, and desperation have changed him dramatically from the once arrogant and certain man he was at the beginning of the play.  He is broken physically, mentally, and spiritually.

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