Does Othello contain any examples of ethos, pathos, or logos in the play? What rhetorical devices does Shakespeare use in Othello?

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Ethos, logos, and pathos are the three pillars of persuasion, and as this play is about Iago persuading people to believe what is not true, these three persuasive devices are used repeatedly in this play.

Ethos is an appeal based on character, credibility, and trust. In ethos, we trust what a person has to say, because we trust the person's character. Iago, incredible as it seems, builds a positive ethos with other characters like Othello. Because Iago pretends to be so reluctant to talk about what he "knows" (what he is, in actuality, making up) and forces Othello to drag it out of him, Othello trusts him as credible source. He believes Iago is very unwillingly telling him a painful truth about Desdemona.

Pathos is an appeal based on emotions, and this is where Iago is most effective. He manages to excite Brabantio into a passion by describing Desdemona's elopement with Othello in animalistic and racist terms. The newlyweds, especially Desdemona, have to talk Brabantio down from his...

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