Do the No Child Left Behind Act, Community Development Block Grants and the Earned Income Tax Credit affect Hispanic families in increasing poverty and decreasing educational attainment?

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pohnpei397 | College Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

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It would be very hard to argue that any of these policies has contributed either to Hispanic poverty or to decreased Hispanic educational achievement.  All of these are programs that are intended to help increase educational achievement and/or reduce poverty.

The No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB) is meant to increase educational achievement among all Americans.  One of the major features of this law was the provision that said that schools have to raise achievement in every demographic group.  This means that schools cannot satisfy the law, for example, by raising white achievement and not Hispanic achievement.  There are many people who think the law is poorly implemented, but people do not generally think that it tends to lower Hispanic educational achievement.

The Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) program is aimed at reducing poverty and related problems.  This program gives federal money to help fund programs that help the poorest people in the United States.  We could certainly argue that there should be more money put into the program or that it does not do enough to help, but it would be very hard to argue that it actually causes an increase in poverty among Hispanics.

Finally, the Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC) is another very important policy that helps people who are poor or at risk of becoming poor.  The EITC is a program that gives money to low and moderate-income people who work.  These people file their taxes and then get more money back from the government than they paid in the first place.  Like the CDBG, it is hard to see how this could possible decrease Hispanic educational achievement or increase Hispanic poverty.

All of these policies, then, are policies that tend to help increase Hispanic educational achievement and decrease Hispanic poverty.

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