Is more effort required to move a heavy object or a light object? Explain.  

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An object with more mass, which is often referred to as a heavier object, requires more force to set it in motion if one neglects friction. Newton's second law, F=ma, tells us that the force required to produce a given acceleration is proportional to the mass of the object. Thus an object...

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An object with more mass, which is often referred to as a heavier object, requires more force to set it in motion if one neglects friction. Newton's second law, F=ma, tells us that the force required to produce a given acceleration is proportional to the mass of the object. Thus an object with more mass must be acted upon by more force to accelerate it the same amount as an object with less mass.  

When friction is a factor the force that must be applied to move an object is equal to the force of friction opposing motion. If the friction-producing surface is the same for both objects, a heavier object still requires more force to be set into motion. The force of friction of an object being pushed across a flat surface is equal to the weight of the object times the coefficient of friction of the surface in contact with the object.

It's possible that a heavier object can be moved with less force than a lighter object if the heavier object is  being moved across a different surface with less friction.

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