Does Hamlet really hate his mother?

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Hamlet is tumultuous in his feelings towards his mother.  He resents her for marrying Claudius and so soon after King Hamlet's death.  He displays anger with her actions in his treatment of her after the performance of The Mousetrap ("Mother, you have my father much offended"). Yet, in Act...

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Hamlet is tumultuous in his feelings towards his mother.  He resents her for marrying Claudius and so soon after King Hamlet's death.  He displays anger with her actions in his treatment of her after the performance of The Mousetrap ("Mother, you have my father much offended"). Yet, in Act V, when he sees her swoon after drinking the poisoned wine, Hamlet attacks Claudius and avenges her death. 

His hatred is directly related to her actions; he appears to love her as a son should love his mother.  Her actions have angered and confused him, but Hamlet ultimately reveals a son's love for his mother when he kills Claudius.

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Hamlet is conflicted. It is clear that they cared about each other prior to Gertrude's remarriage--she worries about his depression, and he worries about her lack of it. But though Hamlet wants her to be more morally upright, he does not wish harm to come to her and his father's ghost forbids him to punish her.

Hamlet is no more "in love" with his mother than Ophelia is in love with her father. The sexual references are no evidence of that--not once does he make reference to a sexual union between him and her, or even pun with them. His comments focus on how easy she is and fickle. (On the other hand, he does make sexually suggestive comments directed at Ophelia, asking her if she means "country matters" and if he should "lie" his "head upon" her lap).

Hamlet's sexual innuendo calls into question Gertrude's morality and her faithfulness. In this, he insults both her and Claudius, for they have both broken with protocol in their overhasty marriage. Nothing in the text indicates he is concerned about her faithfulness to him; it is her lack of faithfulness to his father that angers and upsets him.

This is a powerful argument in favour of his filial love for his mom because if he were indifferent toward her, he would not feel as deeply hurt, confused, and betrayed as he does.

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Hamlet loves her and so at the beginning of the play is mostly cold to Claudius because she has failed her son: she remarried too quickly, tarnishing the image he has of his parents' love. However, as the play goes on, and Hamlet learns that Claudius killed his father. This disappointment turns to a more intense sense of betrayal and fury at her. Still, he doesn't know how much she knows, hence, the wild accusations in Act III. He's almost mad with anger at her because she betrayed him, her husband the King and the country.

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