Does God get genuinely angry? My dad loses the plot somestimes. He says sorry after, but sometimes he just goes bang and starts yelling and it's scaaary. (He doesn't hurt us or nothing, just stomping and shouting for a few minutes) He does anger management and he's really lovely the rest of the time and he talks about it with us, but his anger is an emotional weakness that he has to fight againsts. Anger is bad. Why does God get angry? He killed everyone and everything on Earth one time. That seems pretty wild to me. I want to believe that God is love and perfect. But the idea of an angry God who smashed the Earth to pieces in a rage is not my idea of a good God. Why does the Bible say that God can get angry? Anger is an imperfection.

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I think anger is a human emotion. We describe God as angry because we do not know what else to call it. I might describe my dog as angry, but that doesn't mean he is really angry in the same way I am. It is just the only way I know to describe his actions. I don't believe God becomes angry in the same way that we do. In your example of the flood, there are several things to consider. First, God is a just God. He cannot stand by and watch the people of the Earth behaving the way they were. He warned Noah and offered the people a solution through him. Noah tried to save the people but they wouldn't listen to him. God saved the righteous on the boat with Noah. He allowed the flood to wash away the wicked and the evil that was spreading across the land. When we describe God as angry, it isn't the same kind of anger that we experience. Justice can be swift and frightening just as anger can. You might also consider that anger is not a weakness; it is what we do with that anger that can lead to weakness. People get angry. Sometimes that anger is reasonable and sometimes it is not. It is what we do when we are angry that defines our character. Just think, the civil rights movement might never have happened if people weren't angry at the injustice they were suffering.
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I remember reading the Bible cover to cover for the first time many years ago. I confess that I was shocked by how much death and destruction was attributed there to God, especially in the Old Testament, and how angry he often seemed. Even in the New Testament, Jesus often struck me as less meek and gentle than I had assumed he would me. There's an interesting book I've read about (I haven't taken the time to read it) that sees the Bible as showing the evolution of God's personality. Here's a link: http://www.amazon.com/God-Biography-Jack-Miles/dp/0679743685

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When God's anger is described, I've most often heard it called "righteous anger."  I think because (as Christians believe) God is love, and perfect, his anger is considered justified and directed accordingly, at those who truly deserve it.

To compare your father's anger to God's anger is probably not the best comparison, as that would be synonomous with comparing your father to God.  It is a logical parallel, but give God more credit.  He's not human.  And most believe that the average human need not fear, God's wrath is not seeking to destroy those who deserve unconditional love and grace, which He extends more often than His anger.

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I don't believe God gets angry- especially in the way that you describe. I can't help but believe in a loving and merciful God. When bad things happen, I don't think those are results of God's anger. I think those are a result of the necessary balance between good and bad in this flawed Earth we live in.

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Anger is a function of frustration -- something should have happened that didn't, or something did happen that shouldn't.  I find it hard to believe in a vengeful angry God, but I need no proof of vengeful angry humans.

If God is all-knowing and all powerful, then his frustration and anger can't exist. Attributing human emotions to the divine is a bit of an anthropomorphisation.

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I have to agree that I do not think God gets angry in the same way mankind does. The descriptions you provided are distinctly human. That being said, I would suggest that there may be a very blurred definition of what an angry God looks like and a sad God. God wiped out mankind because of what they had become. I do not think it was his anger as much as his disappointment and sadness (though some may disagree with me).

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I don't think that God gets angry in the same way that people do. First of all, he has been around for so long that it would probably take something considerable to make him angry, something he had not seen before. Also, anger and temper tantrums like you describe are human flaws.
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I don't believe that God actually did kill everyone in the world so this doesn't pose an emotional problem for me.

What I was taught was to think of God as a parent who doesn't have the issues that your dad sometimes has.  When we do wrong, we have to be corrected so that we learn to do the right thing.  This correction can seem like anger and punishment to us, but it might not seem that way to God.  He might be in control and simply doing stuff for our own good.  At least, that's what I was taught.

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