Does Francis Bacon specify/imply a standard of morality in Novum Organum? That is, does he indicate what is right/wrong, good/evil, proper/improper in Novum Organum?

Sir Francis Bacon does imply a standard of morality in Novum Organum. However, due to the nature of the work, this morality is limited to the superiority of truth to falsehood and of knowledge to ignorance.

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In Novum Organum, Sir Francis Bacon proposes a new system of logic which he believes to be superior to the Aristotelian system which predominated during the Middle Ages. Bacon is generally considered one of the founders of the scientific method, and his aim in Novum Organum is to banish...

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In Novum Organum, Sir Francis Bacon proposes a new system of logic which he believes to be superior to the Aristotelian system which predominated during the Middle Ages. Bacon is generally considered one of the founders of the scientific method, and his aim in Novum Organum is to banish superstition and ignorance.

One of the most famous sections of the book refers to various idols, which Bacon believes have stood in the way of human progress. First he refers to the idols of the tribe (idola tribus), which perpetuate the view that humanity and the perceptions of humanity are the measure of all things. This is the idol that leads people to try to make sense of the universe in human terms, and reject explanations not immediately explicable in these terms. The next set of idols, the idols of the cave (idola specus) are even more specific, leading each man to consider only his own personal experience in attempting to understand the world.

The morality of Novum Organum, therefore, is exclusively concerned with humanity's relationship to knowledge. The idols are bad because they are obstacles to knowledge and prevent people from seeing clearly or thinking logically. The implied morality declares that truth is to be sought for its own sake and is superior to falsehood, as knowledge is superior to ignorance.

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