Does Emily Dickinson use body language in her poetry? (Does use of color count?)Does Emily Dickinson use body language in her poetry? (Does use of color count?)

1 Answer | Add Yours

wannam's profile pic

wannam | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Educator

Posted on

Some of Dickinson's poems do use body language. For instance, in "I heard a fly buzz when I died" Dickinson uses quite a bit of body language. She describes "the stillness round my form" and the "eyes beside" that "had wrung them dry." "I've seen a dying eye" is another Dickinson poem on a very similar premise. Here she uses the body language of the dying person, again especially the eyes, to make her point. However, I do not think the use of colors can be counted as a body language. I would say that the use of colors would fall better into the category of imagery or symbolism. Though I cannot think of a particular Dickinson example, I am sure a color could be used to describe a body. For instance, his head hung weighted and blue. Again, I would consider the use of color in this description as more imagery or symbolism than body language.

We’ve answered 318,911 questions. We can answer yours, too.

Ask a question