Does Edgar Allan Poe's "The Raven" merit the continued attention that it has received for the last 100 years? Does Edgar Allan Poe's "The Raven" merit the continued attention that it has received...

Does Edgar Allan Poe's "The Raven" merit the continued attention that it has received for the last 100 years?

Does Edgar Allan Poe's "The Raven" merit the continued attention that it has received for the last 100 years?

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accessteacher eNotes educator | Certified Educator

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write13,728 answers

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I really love and enjoy this poem. What I appreciate most about it is precisely what #3 does not like about it, and that is the pyschological element of this poem that gives us an excellent example of projection and self-torture. That may make me kind of morbid, but I think this poem, as with so many of Poe's works, is fascinating not only for its structure and meter but for the understanding it gives us about death and how it impacts those that are left behind more than those that die.

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Lori Steinbach eNotes educator | Certified Educator

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There is just something appealing about this poem when it is read aloud. As others have said, "The Raven" is a perfect blend of sound and sense--the words and rhythm match the tone and meaning. It is intricately rhymed and metered, full of all kinds of poetic elements (alliteration, figures of speech, rhyme, and others) which are fairly easy to identify. This makes it useful to study as well as interesting to read--and the multitudes of parodies and renditions are fun to spend a little time on, as well. I never study it in class for more than a day, and it is worth that day to me.

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Lorna Stowers eNotes educator | Certified Educator

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Poe simply seems to be one of those staples that exist within literature. Students tend to like the dark language and "spooky" themes of Poe's works. "The Raven" has actually been portrayed on "The Simpsons". My students love watching it after reading the poem. It seems to just be one of those poems that has the power to stick it out.

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lsumner eNotes educator | Certified Educator

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write1,184 answers

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When teaching a poem like "The Raven," a teacher can tell how effective it was by hearing the students in the hall quoting "Nevermore" and "Lenore." My high school students seem to appreciate this poem in all its dark, deep, mysterious language. This poem will be around for quite some time. Also, my students seem to enjoy repeating the term "bells, bells, bells." Poe fascinates his readers. They always come back for more.

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Jessica Pope eNotes educator | Certified Educator

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I definitely think the Raven should be taught, and consider it one of the best American poems ever. Rarely is there such a perfect mix of style and substance. The Raven both sounds incredibly rhythmic and beautiful, but also includes excellent use of literacy devices, such as metaphor, alliteration, irony, and allusion. In addition there excel technical strengths, the use of verse, meter, rhyme scheme, and inner verse rhyming all work something to create an image and give voice to the speaker. For me, the Raven is everything a poem should be. It may not play or read like a film or novel, but the rhythmic and unchanging reframe of the raven's "nevermore”, unaccompanied by anything else, combined with the themes of love, lost love, death, loneliness and one’s decent into insanity,  make many important comments on life, and does so beautifully and stylishly.

 

 

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larrygates eNotes educator | Certified Educator

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I totally see why the poem is so famous. Dark and brooding as he was, Poe experienced real pain watching his beloved wife die slowly from tuberculosis, the disease which he dreaded more than any other. The poem expresses beautifully the pain of losing a love one which never goes away. The raven is not so much frightening as it is a depressing and painful presence which will depart "nevermore." And the Raven DOES say something--by his very presence. The speaker is not frightening himself, he is crying out for relief from the pain:

`Prophet!' said I, `thing of evil! - prophet still, if bird or devil! -
Whether tempter sent, or...

(The entire section contains 10 answers and 1,164 words.)

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litteacher8 eNotes educator | Certified Educator

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write15,968 answers

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pohnpei397 eNotes educator | Certified Educator

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write35,413 answers

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bullgatortail eNotes educator | Certified Educator

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