Does The Christian Church Reflect The Teachings Of Jesus.I've got this paper and I'm so not understanding it. The lecturer guy is just talking some foreign language for me. Can anybody point me in...

Does The Christian Church Reflect The Teachings Of Jesus.

I've got this paper and I'm so not understanding it. The lecturer guy is just talking some foreign language for me. Can anybody point me in the right direction???? Does the Christian Church reflect the teachings of Jesus....

Like I should know??? Please help. I have two weeks.

Asked on by beefheart

7 Answers | Add Yours

litteacher8's profile pic

litteacher8 | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

Posted on

Basically, the Christian Church claims to follow the teachings of Jesus.  Whether or not the Church actually does is really difficult to say.  Jesus lived so long ago, and the words of the Bible have been translated so many times, that there may be no way to know.

brettd's profile pic

brettd | High School Teacher | (Level 2) Educator Emeritus

Posted on

Which church?  I really think it depends on that, and on how you interpret the teachings of Jesus.  I think you can find an endless supply of hypocrisy, prejudice, hatred and greed in some churches.  You can also find an endless supply of love, peace, charity and forgiveness in others.  Most often you'll find a mix of both.  It is inherently difficult to generalize a thesis that accurately portrays an entire church as regards the teachings of Jesus.

ask996's profile pic

ask996 | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Senior Educator

Posted on

I love how the previous posts have given you some clear guidance in ways to establish a thesis--the Christian church does/does not reflect the teachings of Christ. Something you will need to consider in persuading your audience is that there are many examples of church members or church officials who clearly have not followed the teachings of Christ. So your paper might need to define "church". Is it the body of faith encompassed by the institution or the congregants?

akannan's profile pic

Ashley Kannan | Middle School Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

Posted on

The previous posts do a nice job of analyzing this.  I might suggest that reading or grasping the teachings of Jesus as reflected in the New Testament could serve as the base of your analysis.  Exploring the different institutional expressions of his teachings might be a good way of addressing the topic, at hand.  This would also allow you to delve into the modern social and political implications of Christianity, something that can move the paper into an entirely new dimension.  At the same time, this will permit you to explore those institutions who enjoy a sense of public credibilty in the expression of Jesus' teachings and examine those who do not possess the same level of public support and credence.

enotechris's profile pic

enotechris | College Teacher | (Level 2) Senior Educator

Posted on

In theory.  In theory, Communism works.  In theory, your taxes help the poor.

The problem with religious institutions is that they're composed of people who make up the institution, each with his or her own bias and agenda.  So what an institution may "officially" state may (and most likely is) in contraindication to what's been stated earlier. This isn't restricted, unfortunately, to just religious institutions, but any large corporate-esque organization.

If one reads the New Testament, and assumes it correctly chronicles the life, actions and teachings of Jesus, simply compare those teachings with all the institutions that have been established from their own concepts of Christianity, and you'll have your answer.  A more colourful study may be the history of the divisions between different Christian sects, and how they did (or didn't) reflect Jesus' intentions.

What more in the name of love.

 

 

pohnpei397's profile pic

pohnpei397 | College Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

Posted on

This is a pretty huge topic.  So what I think you need to do is narrow it down.  First, I'd identify what you think the core teachings of Jesus are -- as many teachings as you think are important or as many as you need to get enough pages...  For me, the core teaching would be the Golden Rule, though of course Jesus pairs that with "have no other gods before me."

So then you just have to start looking at actions and beliefs of the Christian Church.  Now this is pretty hard because there's not one Christian Church and there hasn't been for centuries.  I'd suggest you talk to your teacher about this -- does he have in mind one particular sect or does he want you to generalize somehow.

Once you figure that out, then ask yourself about the core teachings and practices of that church.  Do they reflect what you have decided are the core teachings of Jesus?

I hope that helps some...

picturesque's profile pic

picturesque | Student, Undergraduate | (Level 1) Valedictorian

Posted on

No, the Christian Church does not reflect what Jesus Christ claimed and taught. Jesus Christ never claimed himself to be a universal prophet and he only claimed himself to be a prophet for Israilites.

Read New Testament and you will know the facts many facts which are which are not at all practiced today.

For example Jesus teaches in the New Testament :

"if someone slaps you in your face turn other side of your face to him/her to slap you"

But today the reverse is true of Christianity.

hadayat

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