Does Atticus Finch work hard for his children in To Kill a Mockingbird?

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Atticus Finch absolutely works hard for his children by acting as a morally-upright role model, teaching them important life lessons, and attempting to raise them as tolerant, responsible citizens. Atticus is motivated to valiantly defend Tom Robinson in order to act as a positive role model for his children and...

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Atticus Finch absolutely works hard for his children by acting as a morally-upright role model, teaching them important life lessons, and attempting to raise them as tolerant, responsible citizens. Atticus is motivated to valiantly defend Tom Robinson in order to act as a positive role model for his children and show them the importance of integrity, true courage, and equality. Atticus purposely refuses to compromise his morals in order to set a positive example for his children and courageously endures public criticism and physical threats to show Jem and Scout the importance of following their conscience. In addition to acting as a positive role model, Atticus is honest with his children, allows them to confide in him, and teaches them important life lessons, which will help them develop into conscientious, respectable citizens.

Atticus is also careful to control his temper and remain tolerant towards his racist, hostile neighbors at all times. For example, Atticus goes out of his way to help Mrs. Dubose conquer her morphine addiction and does not harbor negative feelings towards Walter Cunningham after he attempts to lynch Tom Robinson. While Atticus regrets putting his children through the difficult ordeal, he has good intentions and tries his best instill positive character traits in Jem and Scout. Despite the enormous amount of peer pressure and the obvious dangers that come along with defending a black man in the Jim Crow South, Atticus works hard for his children by maintaining his composure and acting as a positive role model throughout the trial.

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Atticus does work hard for his children.  He takes Tom Robinson’s case partly as an example to them.  He explains that he would not be able to hold his head up or tell them what to do if he didn’t.

Scout asks Atticus why she is defending Tom Robinson even though he knows he will lose.  He does tell her that just because you can’t win is not a reason to avoid doing something, but he also tells her that he has to set an example.

"For a number of reasons," said Atticus. "The main one is, if I didn't I couldn't hold up my head in town, I couldn't represent this county in the legislature, I couldn't even tell you or Jem not to do something again." (ch 9)

Atticus feels that he needs to set an example for the town and for his children.  He wants his children to be proud of him, but he also wants them to be good people.  He wants them to do as he would do, and look at the world as he does.

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