Does Amir redeem himself at the end of The Kite Runner by Khaled Hosseini?

Amir redeems himself at the end of The Kite Runner when he adopts Hassan’s son Sohrab. His friend Rahim Khan even acknowledges that there “is a way to be good again,” which is a clear signal that Amir can win redemption by raising Sohrab. Amir also announces that the child is actually his nephew, thereby embracing Hassan as his own brother, and forcefully tells his father-in-law never to refer to Sohrab as a lower-class Hazara child.

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Amir redeems himself at the end of The Kite Runner by Khaled Hosseini when he adopts Hassan’s son Sohrab. Amir goes back to the Middle East to get Sohrab and bring him to the United States. He adopts the boy and, along with his wife Soraya, raises him as their own child.

Even his friend Rahim Khan, who has known him since Amir was a baby, says to him over the phone when he calls Amir to ask that he come to see him in Pakistan, “There is a way to be good again.” This is a clear signal that Amir’s actions going forward can win his redemption, depending on what he does.

He then proceeds to tell the story of his boyhood and the actions that have haunted him throughout his life and cause his search for redemption.

Although Amir is reluctant at first to face his past, he does travel to Pakistan to see Rahim Khan. He decides to take Sohrab back to America and raise the boy. Importantly, in addition to raising Sohrab, Amir announces that the child is actually his nephew, the son of his father’s illegitimate son Hassan. This admission is significant, because Amir embraces Hassan as his own brother, although this is done after Hassan’s death. Moreover, Amir forcefully tells his disproving father-in-law to never refer to Sohrab as a lower-class Hazara child.

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I would say that he did. There are several major factors to consider with his redemption, not the least of which was going to find Hassan and ask for his forgiveness near the climax of the novel. This act alone would have reconciled himself to his friend and helped ease his guilt, and attempting to do so, in spite of learning of his friend’s death, helped that guilt. Additionally, however, he saved Hassan’s son from Assef. By preventing the destruction of another young boy’s life and striking back at the villain from their childhood, Amir stepped up to cast out his boyhood demons.

In addition to all of that, the story comes full circle with Amir running a kite for Sohrab, Hassan’s son. This is a reversal of how Amir was treated by Hassan, with Amir now playing the kindhearted servant role, showing devotion and care for the boy.

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Yes, Amir redeems himself by the end of the novel. Throughout the story, Amir harbors deep feelings of guilt for not intervening when Hassan was raped by Assef. Amir's overwhelming feelings of guilt lead him to accuse Hassan of stealing his gifts in order to get him kicked out of their home, which ends the relationship between Baba and Ali. After moving to America to begin a new life, Amir eventually becomes a successful author and gets married. One day, Rahim Khan calls Amir and tells him, "There is a way to be good again" (Hosseini, 2). After Amir travels to Pakistan to visit his dying friend, Rahim Khan asks Amir to save Sohrab, Hassan's son. Amir then learns that Hassan was his half-brother and agrees to enter the Taliban-occupied country of Afghanistan. Amir atones for his past sins by rescuing Sohrab from Assef during a bloody fight and escaping to Pakistan. Amir then decides to adopt Sohrab and takes him to America to begin his new life. Amir redeems himself by the end of the novel when he risks his life saving Sohrab and chooses to adopt him.

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Amir does redeem himself at the end of the story. He always wanted to impress his father and always admired him. He admired him mostly for his bravery, an attribute that he did not see in himself. Sadly, Baba realized his son’s weakness and directly expressed his reservations. He was afraid that his son would never be able to stand up for himself. Amir, on the other hand, squandered his early opportunities to demonstrate his ability to not only to stand up for himself but also for those he loved. When Amir was confronted and almost assaulted by Assef, it was Hassan who stepped up and defended him. Amir did not have the courage to stop Assef when he was sexually assaulting Hassan. In addition, he framed Hassan for theft to escape his guilt. However, at the end of the story, Amir saves Sohrab after a fight with Assef, and he eventually assumes Hassan’s role as Sohrab’s father. Through his actions, he was able to gain a sense of relief from his past.

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Khaled Hosseini's novel The Kite Runner revolves around the sins and guilt of its protagonist, Amir. In his childhood, and at the beginning of the text, Amir witnesses the rape of his friend Hassan during a kite running contest. Hassan is raped because he refuses to give up Hassan's kite to the local bully when he is running it in the kite running contest. Amir says and does nothing to prevent the rape. In his confusion and shame, he rejects Hassan. Amir lives with this guilt for the rest of his childhood, and it ends up shaping many of his adulthood decisions. 

At the end of The Kite Runner, Amir has rescued Hassan's son, Sohrab, from sexual slavery. This rescue causes Amir significant physical, mental, and fiscal sacrifices. It's not until the final scene, in which Amir runs the kite for Sohrab, that Amir finally redeems himself. By making the decision to assume Hassan's role, Amir absolves himself of his childhood prejudices and sins. 

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