Do you think Work Breakdown Structures are important to building a successful project plan? Do you think a project can be successful without a documented WBS? To back up your opinion, I would like...

Do you think Work Breakdown Structures are important to building a successful project plan? Do you think a project can be successful without a documented WBS? 
To back up your opinion, I would like you to describe from your work experiences ONE of the following: 


1. A particularly good or bad experience on a project where a WBS (or lack of one) had a major impact. 
2. A particularly effective or unique method for creating a WBS you have seen or been a part of. I am not looking for graphical methods for displaying WBS information - I am interested in how the project team and the organization went about defining content for the WBS. 

Asked on by tsekiteri

1 Answer | Add Yours

thetall's profile pic

thetall | (Level 3) Educator

Posted on

Work Breakdown Structures are beneficial because they help organize projects into sizable chunks for teams to work on. This form of organization helps with budget development and allocation because it helps determine the amount of work and time allocated to each team and its members. Any problems arising can quickly be traced and information about how they impact other levels of the project can be determined.

It is difficult to achieve success with an undocumented WBS because of the distortion that inherently occurs in verbal agreements. The deliverables are easily mixed up due to team or member confusion given there is no reference whatsoever to offer direction.

Work Breakdown Structures are usually done similarly across all organizations with deliverables established to team or individual levels. Certain organizations may use color codes to track the level of the individual deliverable. For example, the color green may be used to show complete deliverables, blue for ongoing ones, and red for those that are at risk.

Sources:

We’ve answered 318,983 questions. We can answer yours, too.

Ask a question