Does "In Another Country" reflect the sense of disillusionment that arose among the writers and artists during World War I? 

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mwestwood | College Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

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There are several indications in Hemingway's story of the disillusionment reflective of the "lost generation" of writers and artists subsequent to World War I.  Certainly suggestive of the sense of displacement that settled into the hearts of many is the title, "In Another Country," as the narrator, who is American, finds himself feeling alienated from the Italian soldiers.

I was a friend, but I was never really one of them...and they had done very different things to get their medals.

Along with the others who are injured, he does not "go to it [the war] any more" and is further isolated.

The distrust of the rehabilitation machinery is also indicative of the disappointment in the ability of technology to solve man's problems. Depicting the disbelief in machinery is the major who regards a photograph that the doctor shows him of a man's hand that was rehabilitated.

"Very interesting, very interesting," the major said, and handed it back to the doctor.
"You have confidence?"
"No," said the major.

Further detachment from beliefs in happiness and love occur with this major, whose young wife dies, leaving him alone and bereft of all hope in life. And because "he did not believe in the machines," he looks straight ahead, not watching the machine to which his hand is attached; then, he speaks angrily and bitterly, saying that a man must not get married. 

"He should not place himself in a position to lose that....He should find things he cannot lose."

Others are desolated as well. The tall young man who has studied to be a lawyer has "lived a very long time with death," and is now alienated from life because for him and for others, life seems to hold no purpose. Especially for the major, life is meaningless and he "only looked out the window" during his therapy. He is in despair, desolated and alone.

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