do you think that a major purpose of the law should be to generate social change as it is in socialist law?

1 Answer | Add Yours

gsenviro's profile pic

gsenviro | College Teacher | (Level 1) Educator Emeritus

Posted on

The aim of the law is to regulate one or more activities or behaviors. Socialist law is typical of communist countries/markets and is characterized by abolishing the ruling class, nationalizing property, depriving people of privacy & intellectual property rights and restricting political discord. While socialist law provides for welfare of citizens, it does so at the cost of the wealthier people and does not provide much democracy or options to people. 

While social change should be an integral part of decision making, law cannot be made to just carry out this purpose. Think of how intellectual property can benefit the economy in general and some individual in particular, something missing in socialist law. Laws may be geared to provide social change and justice, however, all of them cannot be used for this purpose. A point to remember here is the intangible benefit of a law, against the tangible (or visible) benefits of law. Facebook would not have been developed in China or Russia. On the face of it, it has no apparent social value. On the other hand, its use brings people together through social exchange and thus may create social change (think about cases where missing children have been located very quickly through post sharing on Facebook). 

Sources:

We’ve answered 318,912 questions. We can answer yours, too.

Ask a question