Since "postmodernist and modernist" are just perspectives, is it necessary for modernist counselors to embrace more Postmodern ideas?

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M.P. Ossa | College Teacher | (Level 1) Distinguished Educator

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In the 2010 essay "Consequences of the Postmodernist Vision: Diversity as the Guiding Value for the Counseling Profession", Hansen defines postmodernist perspectives as "anti-essential", and "multidimensional" and modernist perspectives as "essential" and "one-directional". This does not place negative criticism over either perspective, but does invite to consider what the Postmodernist perspective proposes: that the individual is not just one essential character, but may current and potential characters that should be addressed with equal consideration. 

Simply put, multiple and often discordant, internal voices speak within every individual, and there is no reason to unify these voices into some congruent whole. Indeed within the postmodernist vision, the humanistic ideal of identity congruence places extraordinary limits on the freedom, creativity, and adaptability of identity processes.

This entails that there is a reality at hand that may be currently ignored by modernist thinkers, and that addressing such reality should bring about better results. This is no different than doing the same thing in other professions: considering the whole client and not just a fragment of the client results in the application of multiple strategies and different interventions. The same goes with medicine, teaching, law practices, and even general mechanics: understanding the multidimensional nature of the task at hand leads to a fuller and richer experience. 

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