Do you think a teenage parent can adequately teach their child things like social skills, self-esteem and money management principles? Do you think a teenage parent can adequately teach their child things like social skills, self-esteem and money management principles?

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It really depends on the teenager. I have known some remarkably mature kids, who had experiences and knowledge well beyond their years. Although the act of getting pregnant indicates a lack of emotional maturity and emotional intelligence, I do think there are some who can do it better than older parents.
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It becomes logically dubious that a teen parent can teach his/her children life skills early on because if this parent has had a solid foundation and grasp of such things, one wonders, would the teen even have become a parent?

However, since people do, indeed, learn from mistakes, sometimes a teen parent comes to grip with adult issues more quickly after his/her experience and understands in hindsight the importance of managing one's life.  But, still, it seems that there must be another source to provide the initial instruction for such a young parent.

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By the time the teen parent gets to the point where money management, social skills, and self-esteem need to be taught (assuming infants and toddlers are not immediately in need of being taught these things though they immediately need to feel and be benefited by these things), the teen parent isn't quite such a teen anymore. By the time the needs arise, this category of parent may--or may not--have been mentored well enough themselves that the needed abilities are present. The more pressing question is whether the teen parent can feel joy and elation at having their life interrupted so early by inescapable responsibility and whether the teen parent can nurture the child with welcome, admiration, patience, tenderness, gentleness, understanding, compassion, emotional and psychological stability, and respect--the things that develop into self-esteem and social skills over time. From my exposure to teen parents and the result of their parenting, I conclude that, in an overwhelming percentage of incidents, no they can not. This tends toward a furtherance of the same trend so that when the time comes this parent will not be able to teach self-esteem (as it will surely be lacking), social skills (as they will surely be lacking), and money management (as the parent may well have not had opportunity for learning this themselves).

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Many of the answers are very solid, especially the second.  Almost by definition, it would be possible to find at least one teen mother who could provide these things, so, yes, it can be done. However, it would seem difficult for the typical teen mother to provide these things as well as an older mother could.  Much would also depend on the age of the teen mother; an 18-year-old teen mother would probably be more likely to provide these things than a 13-year-old teen mother.  In general, it seems best if people wait until they get out of their teens before becoming parents.

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This is a difficult question!  How many times have we, as adults, wished that we had taken our parent's advice?  We learn best, and hardest, through experience.  It is hard to teach others lessons until we understand them on a personal level, but I think the challenges and experiences of being a young parent teaches these teens things that talks from parents and teachers simply can't get across.  As their children get older these young parents have a wonderful opportunity to teach lessons to their own children that their peers probably have no concept of yet.  Being a parent is  a tough job at any age.  My children are teenagers and I often wish I could start over and parent them again from the beginning because I understand so much more now.

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I think it depends a lot on the teenage parent. I believe that there are a number of excellent teenage parents out there who are able to raise their children effectively and teach them important life skills and lessons. The challenge is though that there are a number of teenage parents who have not had a chance to develop those kind of life skills and lessons for themselves and therefore will find it very difficult to pass on what they have never been taught.

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Of course a teenage parent can adequately do these things.  The problem is that it will be harder for a teen parent to do it.  There is nothing that a teen parent is completely incapable of doing.  However, teen parents' relative youth makes it harder for the average teen to do a good job raising a child.  This varies, of course, from individual to individual.

The problem with being a teen parent is that you are not yet completely grown up (if there is such a thing) and yet you are trying to raise a child.  Teens tend to have, for example, less of an ability to judge the long-term impacts of their actions.  They also have a harder time controlling their emotions than adults do.  (Again, these are generalizations that are not true for all teens.)  Because of this, it is harder for teens to be parents because so much of parenting involves keeping control of one's emotions and trying to understand what is in a child's best long-term interests.

Because teens are not yet completely mature in ways like this, it is not easy for them to do these sorts of things.  However, it is possible and we should not assume that every child of a teen parent will have trouble developing.

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