Do you think the study of human evolution is important or relevant?

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It is fascinating to learn about how living things have adapted to a changing Earth. That said, when one looks at differences in current people and fossils of our past ancestors, it is interesting to see differences in size, shape of the skull, and other humanoid features. It is also interesting to compare...

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It is fascinating to learn about how living things have adapted to a changing Earth. That said, when one looks at differences in current people and fossils of our past ancestors, it is interesting to see differences in size, shape of the skull, and other humanoid features. It is also interesting to compare other Primates with man, such as apes and orangatans. Evolution is ongoing and natural selection weeds out the least adapted individuals, making way for the "fittest" individuals to survive and reproduce. It would be interesting to see how humans would look in the future, if one could time travel.

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As a student of both science and English Bible, I find the above discussions intersting.  In science, we acccept the uncertainty principle ( if we know where a particle is, we know nothing of its path to get there).  Secondly, all scientific study is based on models, hypotheses-if you will. These models have all been modified, sometimes abandoned when new evidence has demonstrated the need.  So, what is evidence?  It is a fact that I choose to believe.  There is a suggestion that evolution is a "truth", but no suggestion as to the nature of truth.  The accumulation of research data is a peronal selection choice.  My own professional and published research was done in an area that many of my predecessors felt was complete and finished.  The thrill of research lies in always being ready to look beyond.

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Absolutely so.  The study of science in general is important and relevant, but understanding the evolutionary processes and history of the human race offers us key insights into our anatomy, genetic makeup, and adaptability.  At this moment in time, with the issues facing us, you can't get much more relevant than that. It is essential to understanding not only where we have come from, but what we are capable of in the future.

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Interestingly, Charles Darwin was studying to become a minister before he took his trip to the Galapagos Islands, so the charges against him of being athestic in his Origin of Species certainly appear unfounded.

Evolution is intrinsic to nature.  The adaptation of animals to their environments provides an intriguing and informative study for students; it is an observable fact.  Survival of the fittest has also been a proven fact, at least before modern medicine intervened.

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I agree with the above posts that the teaching of human evolution is absolutely essential. It is unfortunate that there are those who see a conflict between religion and science. Many of my students are offended when we discuss the evolution of humans at the beginning of my World History class; and I try to tell them that there is no conflict between the teachings of the Bible and the theory of evolution; sadly many of them refuse to see it.

It is impossible for one to understand how we humans got where we are, and why we act the way we do at times without some understanding of the evolutionary process.

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Yes. The study of human evolution is very important because it touches on several aspects of human nature such as the development of cognitive abilities, the capability to acquire and understand language, changes in human diet, changes in the human body's defenses and much more.

I think that if we do not give ourselves the chance to analyze the process of the evolution of the human race we are depriving ourselves of very important information that could lead us to predict how else mankind will change in the future. To me, it is criminal when I hear that schools choose to teach Creationism versus the Evolution. In fact, I feel it is counter-productive and ridiculous and should not be allowed.

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I concur with most of the same points as pohnpei. It is a form of scientific history, and I find nearly all forms of history fascinating. Additionally, the history of human evolution is important from a scientific point of view, serving as a counterpoint to those who choose The Bible and religious teachings as absolute fact.

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This is, of course, a matter of opinion.  My opinion is that the study of human evolution is important only in an academic sense.  It is very interesting (at least to me) but it is not important in any tangible way.

I am very interested in human evolution simply because it is fascinating to think about issues like why humans evolved the way we did.  Why do we, alone, walk upright?  Why do we have language when no other animals do?  But these are questions that have no effect on my (or anyone else's) daily lives.  If we knew nothing about them, it would not make us poorer.  We cannot really even learn any lessons from our evolution with regard to how we should live our lives today, which means that human evolution is even less relevant than things like ancient history.

Therefore, I believe the study of human evolution is interesting, but not important.

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