Do you think Shakesperalso saw evil as stronger than forces of good?One of the main themes of Macbeth centers on evil, which Shakespear saw as a force beyond human understanding. Support your...

Do you think Shakesperalso saw evil as stronger than forces of good?

One of the main themes of Macbeth centers on evil, which Shakespear saw as a force beyond human understanding. Support your answer with event(s) from the play.

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tinicraw | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Educator Emeritus

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First, you must consider that Macbeth is a tragedy; one of the deepest and darkest tragedies, too. The whole point of a tragedy is to uncover some human flaw that we can relate to, thereby driving home the possibility of the same thing happening to anyone. As for the theme of evil, one must clearly identify it.  Where does evil originate? from the Devil? from the Witches? from within ourselves? Is your teacher asking you what Shakespeare actually thought, or is s/he asking you to find the main lesson about evil in Macbeth. For argument's sake, let's say that the moral of the story in the play is that evil originates from the supernatural; would the witches be a source of evil or messengers of evil?  If they are messengers, then the sources is elsewhere.  If they are the source, then the next question to be asked is what power to humans (or Macbeth in this case) have over their reactions to powerful emotions like that of ambition and greed that follow from temptation?

Had Macbeth chosen to disregard the witches message, not kill Duncan or MacDuff's family, would things have turned out differently? in compliance with fateful stories,  no matter what the protagonist does, s/he cannot escape the prophesies given. Therefore, Macbeth could have avoided all of the evil deeds and still been king had he not chosen to do evil.

I think Shakespeare saw that evil, once given the chance, can be stronger than the forces of good.

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