William Shakespeare Questions and Answers

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Do you think Shakespeare should still be taught in schools?    

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litteacher8 eNotes educator | Certified Educator

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I think it's important to teach Shakespeare.  First of all, the students always enjoy it.  I think they feel important, because they are now in the know.  The other important reason is that they are very teachable- there's a lot of meat to them, and they are alluded to often in our culture.

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ask996 eNotes educator | Certified Educator

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There is a reason that William Shakespeare is still taught. His writing was phenomenal for his time, and it has stood the test of time. However, teachers tend to forget that he was a poet as well, and many phrases students are familiar with originated with Shakespeare, as did some words they might know. Does this mean that his works have to be taught in their entirety? Probably not. Certainly some are worth forging through to the very end, but others could be taught focusing only on certain portions.

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mwestwood eNotes educator | Certified Educator

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No one author teaches us more of life than Shakespeare.  As post #3 states, Shakespeare is essential to the understanding of other texts, even in something as basic as the title as over a thousand...

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thewanderlust878 | Student

I think that this is a great question that has been asked quite a bit by people in our society today. As the education system changes, it is interesting to see that many people wish to forgo learning Shakespeare altogether. I don't believe that this should be the case. I personally believe that Shakespeare should continue to be taught for years to come. 

As I remember my time in school learning about Shakespeare, I remember how it took a bit of effort to be able to interpret and understand all that the text said, but also remember how after I understand it, I felt not only proud of myself for figuring it out and understanding, but was also able to connect with the stories on a deeper level. 

I believe that Shakespeare's work is still relevant in today's society, on top of the fact that it is a good stretch for the brain to interpret the old English. 

Hope this helps!

krishna-agrawala | Student

Reacting to the following reaction in post #2:

... my response would be why not?

I, believe the biggest argument against teaching Shakespeare in school is the language. Though the language used i works of Shakespeare is English, it is very different from the English we know and speak today. Therefore, Shakespeare becomes suitable only for students who are interested classic literature and roots of English language. It is not suitable fr those interested in learning only as a language useful to them in their daily lives.

Of course, some suitable translations of works of Shakespeare in more contemporary English could be used for all students to give them the benefit of exposure to Shakespeare, without burdening them with the task of learning an outdated version of English.