Do you think Huxley takes these women characters as seriously as he does the men? Why or why not?In some ways, Linda and Lenina are the most serious rebels of the brave new world. How does the...

Do you think Huxley takes these women characters as seriously as he does the men? Why or why not?

In some ways, Linda and Lenina are the most serious rebels of the brave new world. How does the experience of each character challenge the assumptions of the dystopia? Do you think Huxley takes these women characters as seriously as he does the men? Why or why not?

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emeraldjde eNotes educator| Certified Educator

There isn't enough space allotted to get into a decent answer for the first part of your question about how the experiences of Linda and Lenina (note the similar names) challenge the assumptions of the dystopia.  However, the eNotes character pages given below are great reference points to get you started successfully down that path.

As for the other, more subjective questions, I believe you could argue it either way.  You'd want to put parameters on "seriously", though.  As a writer, he takes them seriously enough to include them and make them relevant to the men whose lives they are a part of, but does that men that Huxley himself, personally, took them seriously -- that's only answerable by Huxley.

Personally, I do believe that these characters are as important as the men because they help to bring certain understandings of the two worlds into the reading that otherwise would not be obtained.  As a woman, though, it may be, admittedly, that I am identifying more to them than to Bernard or John, their counterparts.  Huxley does seem to put a great deal of energy into developing these characters, more so than Fanny, for example.  She's really only a part of the story to help us understand Lenina.  Though, one could argue that Lenina and Linda are only there to help us understand Bernard and John.

What do you think?  Did you feel like Huxley was taking these characters as seriously as the men when you were reading the novel?

It's a great question; good luck with it!

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Brave New World

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