Did Fitzgerald intentionally represent patriarchy (traditional gender stereotyping) in a negative way in The Great Gatsby?  Explain.

Expert Answers

An illustration of the letter 'A' in a speech bubbles

To a large extent, this does seem to be a fairly valid point about Fitzgerald's work.  In an age where women had more freedom and more say about who they are, Fitzgerald's depiction is one where women are nothing more than individuals who are driven by wealth, parties, the best...

Unlock
This Answer Now

Start your 48-hour free trial to unlock this answer and thousands more. Enjoy eNotes ad-free and cancel anytime.

Start your 48-Hour Free Trial

To a large extent, this does seem to be a fairly valid point about Fitzgerald's work.  In an age where women had more freedom and more say about who they are, Fitzgerald's depiction is one where women are nothing more than individuals who are driven by wealth, parties, the best clothes, and social status.  I think that Fitzgerald represented women in this manner based on his own personal experience.  His relationship with Zelda had to play a role in how he perceived women and the social setting he was absorbing at the time would have added to this perception.  It can be argued that he was not entirely attempting to lock women in a socially stratified role, but lock everyone who was immersed in the Jazz Age fashion and temperaments of the time in the same role.  Jordan and Daisy are not much different than Tom, in that they are all shown as socially driven creatures who value people as means to ends as opposed to ends in their own rights.

Approved by eNotes Editorial Team