Do you think Elizabeth was right or wrong to defend her husband? Why did she do it and what does that say about the community she lives in?Do you think Elizabeth was right or wrong to defend her...

Do you think Elizabeth was right or wrong to defend her husband? Why did she do it and what does that say about the community she lives in?

Do you think Elizabeth was right or wrong to defend her husband? Why did she do it and what does that say about the community she lives in?

Asked on by crixtah

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pmiranda2857's profile pic

pmiranda2857 | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Educator Emeritus

Posted on

It is admirable that Elizabeth wanted to protect the husband that betrayed her, but she chooses the wrong moment to do it.  In my view she should have been more plain spoken about the reason she put Abigail out of her house.  This was a turning point in the court's decision to proceed with the executions.

Elizabeth was lauded for her honesty and then she tells a lie to protect John.  John's credibility is sunk, and Elizabeth has wasted his last chance at freedom. 

Sadly, the Proctors realize that they love each other in the final hours of his life.   

luannw's profile pic

luannw | High School Teacher | (Level 2) Senior Educator

Posted on

Elizabeth defended her husband because she realized that sinful as her husband had been to have an affair with Abigail, the travesty being committed in the town with the false accusations of witchcraft being thrown at innocent people was a much greater sin.  Elizabeth knows how much her husband loves her and how hard he has fought to get her freed from the accusations made against her.  She lied to Judge Danforth about her knowledge of the affair because she wanted to spare her husband's name in the town.  Elizabeth knows that Salem is a town of narrow-minded people who are quick to judge others. She realizes that she has already been judged by them and that her husband will also be judged by them if they know about his affair with Abigail.

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